After Death Facebook Lives On

Todd Pack is to be thanked for this issue, his blog post this past week is entitled “What Happens to Our Facebook Account After We Die?”

The comments following the post describe a litany of unintended events both by the team at Facebook as well as the individual subscriber, who is now across the Great Divide and cannot now edit the profile. Like everything else that a dead person has an interest in here on earth, they fall into the control of your personal representative as soon as some probate court admits your will to probate.

I guess I will call the dead man’s interest in his Facebook page a “license” but I am sure the people who practice in the field of “intellectual property” ( yes that is what it is called ) might have a more elegant name for what Mark Zuckerberg hath begotten. Instead Facebook is there for us all to use, as long as we follow the rules. Given that Mr. Zuckerberg is only 27 years old today, I doubt he has given much thought to death and what the rules will be then.

One woman describes how her mother passed in 2007, she developed a profile in 2008 on Facebook, and then started getting requests she “friend” her dead mother.

For me the “autocomplete” feature of the software tears the bandage off each time I am writing to my surviving friends about the loss of our close friend Doug, then the sentence automatically spells out his name and a picture of his once happy family. The ostensible purpose is to ask me to include him in the discussion. Yes Mr. Zuckerberg, I would love to have another conversation with Doug, but I have a few years left thank you.

Meanwhile the other social networks are not any better. Linkedin sent me a solicitation to connect with Doug recently as well. I am thinking of Mary Todd Lincoln and seances held to have contact with her lost son in the White House might have had better luck.

So what to do? One commentator to Mr. Pack’s posts suggests directing the personal representative of the will  go about the process of winding these things up. This is a good idea, but I suspect the Letters Testamentary issued by our state court may not be recognized in Massachusetts, or wherever Facebook seems to be headquartered. The company, unlike it’s product, is not public.

Lets try it. At worse this latest generation of billionaires will ignore us and thoughtlessly interrupt our efforts at closure.

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