From the Gates of Hell I Spit at Thee

I am here, in my office, drafting the wills for people who have been divorced for decades but have never really let go. The Ahab and the Whale relationship has not faded in time. Notwithstanding a series of firewalls in law that preclude inheritance by a former spouse, I can see how, particularly given the presence of children from these star crossed marriages, the ex-spouse might end up with property of the testator.

Death is often unexpected. Particularly for the younger set, there may not be a will, and there may not be grandchildren of my client to inherit by intestacy of that sudden decedant. So where does that unfortunate child’s property go?

It goes up. Up the chain of command to that long ago divorced spouse, the surviving parent receiving now what the Superior Court would not give them during the divorce proceedings. Thank you very much.

And so we draft and draft, our dead stick control demanding proof from the grave before a child gets anything that a will or other disposition exists to not have this event of post divorce decree property division take place.

Rather haunting, isnt it? It would be easier if you could take it with you.

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The Power of Attorney – A Banks Sum of All Fears

Banks live in fear. Things have not gone well for them in recent years, and so even the slightest amount of risk leads them to declare all sorts of reasons why they cannot provide service the way their customers need them to when they are unable to bank for themselves. No where is this more pronounced than in their response to a durable power of attorney executed by a depositor, a principal, in favor of the attorney in fact, or agent.

The idea behind a “durable” power of attorney is that your elect to hand to someone the authority to manage your affairs should you become incapacitated, but before you die, which is when your Last Will and Testament becomes effective. This can avoid an expensive guardianship.

Here is a sample of the gymnastic reasons given not to honor these documents:

1) This document is only a copy. My client was in a coma. I presented my copy to the bank one day to allow my clients brother to get to the money in the bank so that same bank could have its mortgage paid. The young man in the lobby looked at the notary crimp and saw it wasnt raised, so rejected it. I drew my notary crimp out of my briefcase, crimped my signature on the same copy, and handed it back to him. We were allowed access to the money. Apparently that made it an original.

2) The references are to bank accounts generally, not our bank. My remedy is to start incorporating the names of the depository institutions into each power of attorney I draft. Older forms do not take this step, which has now become part of the practice.

3) Our bank is referenced, but not the bank account number. So you can put the account numbers down, but this is risky. What if they fall into the wrong hands? Generally we have started putting at least the last 4 digits down, or all of them if the client approves.

4) If you take money out of the account to pay your principal’s bills, that is an estate planning transfer because all this money is designated to go to someone else when the account holder, your principal dies. You are not authorized by this document to make estate planning transfers. While I have begun drafting around this claim, this dodge underscores the duplicitous absurdity of banks claims in recent years. Does this mean that every time a depositor writes a check he is mindful of the impact on his estate?

5) We honor durable powers of attorney, but only the one we drafted, and your principal hasn’t signed this yet. Please have him sign our form then we will allow you access to his money. Right. The principal cannot sign checks competently now, that is why the agent is there, so he cannot possibly sign a new power of attorney the institution drafted. It’s madness, isn’t it?

In Washington we have a statue that allows us to threaten to sue the bank, and sue and recover attorney fees if they fail to honor these documents in good faith. I think they probably have a right to demand the original, or at least some proof the circumstances suggest the copy is a true and correct version of the original but the rest deserve a stern letter from the lawyer.

The best defense against this nonsense is to develop a relationship with the people in the bank lobby between yourself as principal and your agent well before that day you are not able to go to the bank yourself.  Develop trust in a non-threatening environment, put in time reducing the banks fear, and normally this should pave the way to avoid guardianship and a peaceful disposition of your affairs in later life.