The Super Will

Red S

When one dies, one leaves behind two kinds of property: Probate Property, and Non-Probate Property. The SuperWill Statute can blur this distinction and the only kryptonite which can weaken the will are contained in exceptions buried deep in the Code that spawned this hero to some, foe to others.

Probate property is that which is controlled by the will of our departed. The most common example is the house he lived in. Non-probate property is that which, by contract, avoids the probate process and goes directly to those who are designated as beneficiaries payable on death. The most common example is a bank account with a payable on death or joint tenancy with right of survivorship.

But lo- what if we make that contract, perhaps even in a trust with your spouse, then later make a will that says something different about the same property? What if you don’t even know the SuperWill statute exists? Worse, what if you decide to rely on it but are not aware of the limitations on its use?

Lying underneath the surface of many wills is a reference to re-directing property that was non-probate, and suddenly becomes probate, often without a lot of forethought. A recent Supreme Court decision  in our state strongly suggests one can undo the intent of a trust one may have made with a predeceased spouse just by writing a new will. After reading the decision I can say this is not going to happen every time.

Like the man of steel, the Superwill statute is not something to mess with unless you have your own member of the Justice League evaluate what you are doing. The estate planning forms you may get from a paid or unpaid source are not members of the Justice League. After reading the aforementioned case, I am not sure even the new licensed legal technicians Washington now allows have membership.

Like Superman the SuperWill can change everything, or not, and knowing what you are doing means everything.

Bar Stool Advice

Regularly we have people come in who made legal decisions for themselves based on what they heard at work, or at church, or sitting on a bar stool. It doesn’t seem to matter at all that the co-worker, minister or drinking buddy has never practiced law and in all likelihood lacks a license to do so. Usually things are a lot worse after following the layman’s advice.

The ultimate bar stool of course is the internet. Apparently because this medium is a source of reliable information some of the time the unreliable publisher gains the same credibility.

Even when credible, following up on the information can be dangerous. I am sure there are instructions on how to fly an airplane on the internet. Getting a plane, taking off and navigating to a safe landing is something else entirely.

Worse, I was seeing my doctor this week and I asked him how often people came to see him having first self diagnosed on the internet. “Daily” he said.

Tomorrow I see my dentist and I will ask him the same question. Can you imagine, “Do It Yourself Dentistry”? All I can recommend ( and this is not legal advice) is considerable time on the bar stool before attempting the same at home. Be sure to have the cab that brought you there wait because you are going to need to go to the ER after a few minutes.